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Bengals First 50 (top 50 players in franchise history)

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  • Bengals First 50 (top 50 players in franchise history)

    As part of the team's 50th anniversary, the Bengals this week have been announcing their list of the top 50 players in franchise history as voted by the fans and media. The list only includes retired players. The top 10 players will be released later today (7/20/17).

    Here are the one who have been released thus far:

    50 – Stanford Jennings: Scored a touchdown in Super Bowl XXIII with a 93-yard kickoff return. In the top five in team history for kickoff returns (136), kickoff return yards (2752) and longest kickoff return (98-yard touchdown against Kansas City in 1988).

    49 – Tim McGee: Bengals first round draft selection in 1986. Third in team history for average yards per reception (16.68). Led team in receptions (65) and receiving yards (1211) in 1989, including five 100-yard games.

    48 – Robert Geathers: Two-time team leader in sacks and one of 10 Bengals to have 10 or more sacks in a season, having registered 10.5 in 2006. Holds team record for fumble return yards in a season, with 113 in 2009. Recipient of the Ed Block Courage Award in 2013, given to players who best demonstrate commitment to values of sportsmanship and courage.

    47 – Brian Simmons: Bengals first round draft selection in 1998. Versatile linebacker who played all three spots in 122 games as a Bengal. Led team in tackles in 1999, 2003 and 2004.

    46 – Greg Cook: Holds team record for average yards per passing attempt in a season with 9.41 yards per attempt in 1969. Led AFL in passing in 1969, connecting on 106 of 197 passes for a 53.81 completion percentage.

    45 – Eric Thomas: Member of Super Bowl XXIII team. In the top 15 in team history for career interceptions (15). Blocked three field goals in 1991. Made Pro Bowl in 1988.

    44 – Doug Pelfrey: Third in team history in total points, with 660 points scored. Holds team record for consecutive extra points made (103) and ranks third in field goal percentage (77.27).

    43 – Ross Browner: Bengals first round draft selection in 1978 and named to all-rookie team. Third in team history for career sacks, with 59 sacks. Led team in sacks in 1978, 1979 and 1985. Led team in tackles in Super Bowl XVI.

    42 – Lee Johnson: Holds team records for total punts (746), career punting yards (32,196) and punts inside the 20-yard line (186). His 63-yard punt in Super Bowl XXIII ranks second in Super Bowl history.

    41 – Justin Smith: Bengals first round draft selection in 2001. Sixth in team history with 43.5 career sacks. Led the line in tackles for six straight seasons.

    40 – Solomon Wilcots: Member of Super Bowl XXIII team. Finished third in tackles in 1988. Top-flight special teams player who tied for team lead in special teams tackles in 1989.

    39 – Mike Reid: Bengals first round draft selection in 1970. Named top defensive rookie in pro football by several publications. Recorded five sacks in a game in 1972. Made Pro Bowl in 1972 and 1973.

    38 – Rich Braham: One of only seven players to log 13 or more seasons with the Bengals. Played in 146 Bengals games, with 142 starts. Recipient of the Ed Block Courage Award in 2001, given to players who best demonstrate commitment to values of sportsmanship and courage.

    37 – Eddie Edwards: Bengals first round draft selection in 1977. Member of Super Bowl XVI and XXIII teams. Holds team record for career sacks, with 83.5 sacks. Tied for team record for most sacks in a game, with five against Cleveland in 1980. Had a career-best 13 sacks in 1983. Ranks tenth in team history for games played (170).

    36 – Joe Walter: Tied for most seasons played by an offensive lineman (13). Ranks fifth in games played by an offensive lineman (166). Recipient of the Ed Block Courage Award in 1990, given to players who best demonstrate commitment to values of sportsmanship and courage.

    35 – Bruce Kozerski: Versatile player who started at all five offensive line positions. Center on the 1988 team that went to the Super Bowl. His 172 games ranks third in team history among offensive linemen.

    34 – Coy Bacon: Holds team record for sacks in a season, with 22 sacks in 1976. Made Pro Bowl in 1976 and 1977. One of five defensive linemen in team history to go to back-to-back Pro Bowls.

    33 – Jim LeClair: Long-time defensive captain known for being a hard-hitter. Led team in tackles five times (1976, '78-81). Made Pro Bowl in 1976.

    32 – Bill Bergey: AFL Defensive Rookie of the Year in 1969. Led team in tackles in 1969, 1970 and 1971. Voted most valuable player by fans in 1970.

    31 – Pete Johnson: Holds team record for career rushing touchdowns (64). Fourth in team history for career rushing yards (5421). Led team in rushing seven times. Member of Super Bowl XVI team. Made Pro Bowl in 1981.

    30 – Tommy Casanova: Three-time Pro Bowler. Named to NFL All-Rookie team in 1972 and selected by fans as Most Valuable Player. Fifth in team history for punt return yards, with 784 yards on 91 punts.

    29 – Eddie Brown: Bengals first round draft selection in 1985 and named Offensive Rookie of the Year. Holds team record for average yards per reception in a season (24.02 in 1988). Sixth in team history for career receiving yards (6134). Member of Super Bowl XXIII team. Made Pro Bowl in 1988.

    28 – Louis Breeden: Member of Super Bowl XVI team. Tied for team record for longest interception return, with a 102-yard touchdown return. Second in team history for career interceptions (33), career interception return yards (558) and interception return yards in a season (145).

    27 – TJ Houshmandzadeh: Holds team record for total receptions in a season, with 112 receptions in 2007. Third in team history with 507 total receptions. Led team in catches for three straight years from 2006-08. Made Pro Bowl in 2007.

    26 – Carl Pickens: Holds team records for most receiving touchdowns in a season (17 in 1995) and most receptions in a game (13 in 1998). First Bengal to reach 500 receptions. Second in team history in receptions (530), career receiving touchdowns (63) and consecutive 100-yard games (four). Made Pro Bowl in 1995 and 1996.

    25 – Pat McInally: Second in team history for total punts (700) and career punting yards (29,307). Placed 157 punts inside the 20-yard line and averaged 41.87 yards per punt in his career. Made Pro Bowl in 1981.

    24 – Ickey Woods: Holds team record for rushing touchdowns in a season (15). Rushed for 1066 yards as a rookie, helping to make the Bengals the NFL's number one rushing team in 1988. Member of Super Bowl XXIII team. All-rookie in 1988.

    23 – Rodney Holman: Three-time Pro Bowler and member of Super Bowl XXIII team. Versatile player who was an excellent blocker and good pass receiver with speed and strength to make big plays.

    22 – Dan Ross: Instrumental in development of the modern passing game. Scored two touchdowns in Super Bowl XVI. Tied for third for most receptions in a Super Bowl (11 receptions for 104 yards). Made Pro Bowl in 1982. All-rookie in 1979.

    21 – Rudi Johnson: Holds team records for rushing attempts in a season (361), rushing attempts in a game (43) and rushing yards in a season (1458). Second in team history for career rushing touchdowns (48) and most 100-yard games (19). Made 2004 Pro Bowl.

    20 – Bob Johnson: First player drafted in team history and the only player to have his number retired. Played in 154 games, seventh most by a Bengals offensive lineman. Only center in team history to be selected for the Pro Bowl (1968).

    19 – Takeo Spikes: Bengals first round draft selection in 1998. Led team in tackles four out of five seasons and topped the 100-tackle mark five times. Became first rookie to lead team in tackles since James Francis in 1990.

    18 – Dave Lapham: Member of Super Bowl XVI team. Versatile lineman with the ability to play all five offensive line positions. Played in 140 games, ranking ninth in team history for an offensive lineman. Voted Bengals Man-of-the-Year by fans in 1980.

    17 – Bob Trumpy: Four-time Pro Bowl player who was equally adept at blocking and catching the ball. Second in team history in yards per reception average in a season, with 22.57 yards per reception in 1969

    16 – Lemar Parrish: Six-time Pro Bowler (tied for second-most in team history). Holds team records for average yards per kickoff return (24.66 yards), average yards per punt return in a season (18.78 yards in 1974) and career punt returns for touchdowns (four). Fifth in team history for career interceptions, with 25 interceptions.

    15 – Corey Dillon: Three-time Pro Bowler. Holds team records for career rushing attempts (1865), career rushing yards (8061), most 100-yard games (28) and most rushing touchdowns in a game (four). 96-yard touchdown run against Detroit in 2001 is the longest rush in team history.

    14 – Willie Anderson: Four-time Pro Bowler. Bengals first round draft selection in 1996. Played in 181 Bengals games, tied for sixth place on the team's all-time list. Helped set club record for fewest sacks allowed in 2007 at 17. Recipient of the Ed Block Courage Award in 2004, given to players who best demonstrate commitment to values of sportsmanship and courage.

    13 – Max Montoya: Three-time Pro Bowler. Member of Super Bowl XVI and XXIII teams. Honored by Pro Football Weekly as the NFL's best guard at pass blocking. Had a stretch in 1988 where he allowed his opponent to hit the quarterback just once in 237 passes.

    12 – Reggie Williams: Member of Super Bowl XVI and XXIII teams. Second in team history for games played (206) and total sacks (62.5). Third in team history for most seasons played (14). Led team in tackles in 1976, 1977 and 1984. Honors include All-Rookie Team (1976), Byron "Whizzer" White Humanitarian Award (1985), Walter Payton Man of the Year Award (1986) and Sports Illustrated Co-Sportsman of the Year Award (1987).

    11 – Ken Riley: Fifteen year career with the Bengals is second longest in team history. Holds team records for games played (207), career interceptions (65), interception return yards (596) and interception returns for touchdowns (five).

    http://www.bengals.com/news/article-...7-f58d5da69d70

  • #2
    I only question 2 rankings. Brooks is #10 in the last edition, in my opinion Dillon is the best back in Bengals history. He should be lower than Brooks. Maybe flip flop them?? My second question mark is Brian Simmons making the list period. "Puddins" sucked!! One of the , if not softest LBers we have ever had!! He was suited more for pillow fighting....

    Comment


    • #3
      LOL!

      As soon as I saw Simmons' name, I thought "sandwedge is gonna say something about that one!" . His name might as well be Vladimir Puddin' as far as Wedge is concerned.

      IMO, Puddin' did indeed suck as an ILB/MLB, but he was a typical Bengal miscast. He was an OLB his whole life until Cincinnati put him inside and made him the signal caller in a 3-4. Later, when they went to a 4-3 lineup, they put lifelong ILB/MLB Spikes outside because they taught the wrong person, Puddin', to be the signal caller.
      Last edited by Pre_hungover; 07-20-2017, 01:20 PM.
      Only users lose drugs

      Comment


      • #4
        10 – James Brooks: Four-time Pro Bowler. Holds team record for average yards per rushing attempt (4.80). In top five for career rushing yards (6647), rushing attempts (1344), rushing touchdowns (37), rushing yards in a game (201) and 100-yard games (17). Member of Super Bowl XXIII team.

        9 – Isaac Curtis: Bengals first round draft selection in 1973. Four-time Pro Bowler. Holds team record for average yards per reception (17.07). Third in team history for receiving yards (7101), receiving touchdowns (53) and 100-yard games (20).

        8 – Boomer Esiason: Three-time Pro Bowler who led Bengals to Super Bowl XXIII. Named NFL Most Valuable Player in 1988. Holds team records for most 300-yard games (23), passing yards in a game (490) and average yards per passing attempt (7.62). Second in team history for career passing yards (27,149) and touchdown passes (187).

        7 – Cris Collinsworth: Three-time Pro Bowler. Led team in receiving yards in Super Bowl XVI and Super Bowl XXIII. Ranks in the top five in team history for total receptions (417), career receiving yards (6698), average yards per reception (16.06) and most 100-yard games (18).

        6 – David Fulcher: Three-time Pro Bowler. Tied for most interceptions by a safety in a season (eight in 1989) and ranks third in team history for total interceptions (31). Recorded several key tackles, a sack and forced a fumble in Super Bowl XXIII.

        5 – Jim Breech: Bengals all-time leading scorer, with 1151 points. Scored in 186 consecutive games. Thirteen year career with the Bengals is tied for fourth longest in team history. Member of Super Bowl XVI and XXIII teams.

        4 – Chad Johnson: Six-time Pro Bowler (tied for second-most in team history). Bengals career leader in receptions (751), receiving yards (10,783), receiving touchdowns (66) and most 100-yard games (31). Second all-time in total touchdowns (66), behind FB Pete Johnson (70).

        3 – Tim Krumrie: Never missed a game during his Bengals playing career. Started 166 of his 193 games, including a stretch of 160 starts in 161 games. Led team in tackles five times, an unusual feat for an interior lineman. Made Pro Bowl in 1987 and 1988.

        2 – Ken Anderson: Four-time Pro Bowler who led the Bengals to Super Bowl XVI. Named NFL Most Valuable Player in 1981. Sixteen year career with the Bengals is longest in team history. Holds team records for passing attempts (4475), completions (2654), passing yards (32,838) and touchdown passes (197).

        1 – Anthony Munoz: Inducted into Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1998, his first year of eligibility. Eleven-time Pro Bowler, the most in team history. Earned All-Pro honors every season from 1981-91. Received NFL's Man of the Year Award in 1991. Played in both Bengals' Super Bowl games.

        Breech and Collinsworth are a little too high on the list, IMO. Takeo Spikes as well, given that he was only here for five years. I agree that Dillon should be ahead of Brooks, regardless of the terms on which he left. Willie Anderson should have been higher.

        Comment


        • #5
          Where is Essex Johnson. I would have the "Essex Express" over Cook, the local phenom that left as quickly as he came. Also have him over Jennings.

          Jeff "Shake and Blake" might also be on my list. He was the only reason to even go to the game for a few seasons.

          Comment


          • #6
            I agree. Drop Robert Geathers, who is a useless roster spot AGAIN, and put in Blake.

            Don't remember Essex Johnson.
            Only users lose drugs

            Comment


            • #7
              Could have left Jennings and Wilcots off too. Both were bit role players, who had a few moments of uber-fame.

              Agree as to E. Johnson: one of the best players you never saw (unless you saw him in person).
              "This game isn't worth it. The National Football League isn't worth it. There's golf to be played and tennis to be served up and other things to be done out there besides worryin' about a friggin' football game."----The prophet Sam Wyche

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              • #8
                Originally posted by LimaBengal View Post
                Jeff "Shake and Blake" might also be on my list. He was the only reason to even go to the game for a few seasons.
                Yeah, Blake is probably worthy of the top 50. I'd also give consideration to Ashley Ambrose, Lorenzo Neal, Deltha O'Neal, and Tory James. I'm not sure those guys were here long enough to be worthy of the top 50, but they each had a couple of really good years.

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                • #9
                  I would have thought Kirby Criswell would make the list.
                  Marvin Lewis - the Clapping Clown.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'd have Ken Riley in the top 10. he was the shut down corner of his era. it's still a crime that a someone who has been retired for 30 plus years and is still number 5 in INT's is not in the HOF!

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